Grow. Harvest. Eat.

Asparagus

A hardy perennial with tall, fernlike foliage.

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Asparagus
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A hardy perennial with tall, fernlike foliage. Choose a site with full sun and well-drained soil...and a lot of space. Asparagus can live up to 20 years, and its tall foliage can shade other plants—so plan accordingly.

Beans

There are two types of beans: shell beans and snap beans.

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Beans
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There are two types of beans: Shell Beans ~ Grown for the beans within the pod, such as black beans. Snap Beans ~ Grown for the edible pods, such as green beans. Snap beans are available as both bush and pole beans, but pole beans have a longer harvest and can take advantage of vertical space in the garden. The variety of colors available for pole beans makes an attractive, healthy rainbow in recipes, especially good when gardening with kids and encouraging them to eat beans.

Beets

Plant beets in a sunny location with good garden soil.

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Beets
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Plant beets in a sunny location with good garden soil.

Broccoli

There are two types of broccoli—calabrese, the large heads we're most familiar with, and sprouting broccoli.

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Broccoli
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There are two types of broccoli—calabrese, the large heads we're most familiar with, and sprouting broccoli. Calabrese generally grows more quickly than the sprouting variety and is more compact.

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts are one of the hardiest vegetables to grow—they withstand temperatures to 14 degrees F.

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Brussels Sprouts
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Brussels sprouts are one of the hardiest vegetables to grow—they withstand temperatures to 14 degrees F. The sprouts are leaf buds along the main stem, and they actually benefit from frost to enhance their sweetness.

Cabbage

Cabbage is a cool-season vegetable that should be grown in early spring or fall.

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Cabbage
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Cabbage grows well in a wide variety of soils, but well-drained, sandy loam with high organic content is ideal. Soil pH of 5.8 to 6.5 is preferred.

Cabbage is a cool-season vegetable that should be grown in early spring or fall or when temperatures are approximately 60 to 65 degrees F.

Carrots

Carrots are cool season plants that grow best between 60 and 65 degrees F.

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Carrots
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Carrots are cool season plants that grow best between 60 and 65 degrees F. Seeds germinate best from 55 to 75 degrees and will not germinate above 95 degrees. Plant carrots early enough in spring to ensure the crop is harvested in early summer or plant in fall in warm climates for an early winter harvest.

Cauliflower

Cauliflower grows best in a rich, well-drained soil.

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Cauliflower
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Cauliflower grows best in a rich, well-drained soil. Keep pH at 5.8 to 6.5. This cool season vegetable prefers averages temperatures of 60 to 65 degrees. Plant early enough in the season to harvest before temperatures become too hot.

Chard

Chard grows well in all climates and withstands cold and heat better than many greens.

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Chard (aka Swiss Chard)
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Chard grows well in all climates and withstands cold and heat better than many greens. Plant in full sun or partial shade, in beds or containers.

Corn

Sweet corn is a warm season crop that grows best in full sun at temperatures between 60 and 80 degrees F.

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Corn
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Sweet corn is a warm season crop that grows best in full sun at temperatures between 60 and 80 degrees F. It doesn't germinate well in cold soil—wait to sow until the soil temperature at a 4-inch depth is at least 50 degrees. Don't plant in wet soil in early spring unless you enjoy seed rot.

Eggplant

Eggplant is a warm season vegetable that grows best in well-drained soil that is rich in organic matter with a pH of 5.8 to 6.5.

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Eggplant
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Eggplant is a warm season vegetable that grows best in well-drained soil that is rich in organic matter with a pH of 5.8 to 6.5.

Kale

Kale is a cool season crop whose flavor improves when exposed to frost.

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Kale
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Kale is a cool season crop whose flavor improves when exposed to frost.

Peas

There are three types of peas: shelling (or English) peas, snow peas, and snap peas.

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Peas
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Deliciousness—the perfect little fresh snack while working in the garden! Pick and eat immediately. It's why you garden, right?

There are three types of peas: shelling (or English) peas, snow peas, and snap peas. Shelling peas are shucked from their pods—and wonderful when eaten straight from the garden. Snow peas are flat, and snap peas have plump pods. The pods of snow and snap peas are both edible.

Peppers

Peppers are warm-season plants that grow best at temperatures of 70 to 85 degrees F during the day and 60 to 70 degrees F at night.

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Peppers
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Peppers are warm-season plants that grow best at temperatures of 70 to 85 degrees F during the day and 60 to 70 degrees F at night. Peppers need a long growing season and grow slowly during periods of cool weather, making transplants ideal.

There are hundreds of varieties of hot and sweet peppers to choose among.

Potatoes

If you've never eaten a potato fresh from the earth, PLEASE make this the year that you do.

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Potatoes
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If you've never eaten a potato fresh from the earth, PLEASE make this the year that you do. You will thank me. I promise. Potatoes like cool weather and full sun.

Spinach

Spinach likes full sun and cool weather.

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Spinach
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Spinach likes full sun and cool weather. Plant in early spring as soon as you can work the soil, or plant in fall when temperatures cool.

Tomatoes

If there is one thing you should grow at home—it's heirloom tomatoes.

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Tomatoes
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Our true love, the reason most of us started a kitchen garden...how can you not love sun warmed, homegrown tomatoes? You'll never find the gorgeous color varieties or quirky shapes in your grocery store. If there is one thing you should grow at home—it's heirloom tomatoes.